World literature was long defined in the English speaking world as an established canon of European masterpieces, but an emerging global perspective has challenged this European focus. Now it is better understood as literature that has travelled, and been translated, from its original source.

This China in Conversation teased out from an Australian and Chinese perspective the issues surrounding interpreting and reading world literature: from the classics of Chinese literature to J.M.Coetzee’s works that travel from South Africa to Australia and translate to Chinese readers; from the controversial novels of author Yu Hua to Nobel Prize recipient Mo Yan.

Speakers

Professor Wang Jinghui

Professor Wang Jinghui is the Deputy Director of Australian Studies Centre, Professor of Comparative Literature and World Literature, Head of the Discipline of Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies, Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, Tsinghua University. She specializes in Australian Studies, Intercultural Communication and World Literature. Her book publications include Foreigner Forever: On J.M. Coetzee (Peking University Press, 2010) and a dozen other books on English Language learning and academic writing. She is also a translator of several books on cultural studies and Chinese arts, such as J.M. Coetzee: A Life in Writing (2017), John Docker’s Postmodernism and Popular Culture (2010), J M Coetzee’s Foe (2008), Agatha Christie’s Lord Edgeware Dies (1997), and The Art of Chinese Couplets (in English)(2016).

Professor Nicholas Jose

Professor Nicholas Joseis Professor of English and Creative Writing at The University of Adelaide. Heis an Australian author best-known for his fiction and cultural essays. His seven novels and three collections of short stories include Bapo, Paper Nautilus, The Red Thread and Original Face. His acclaimed memoir Black Sheep: Journey to Borroloola appeared in 2002. He was general editor of the Macquarie PEN Anthology of Australian Literature (2009) and has written widely on contemporary Australian and Asian art and literature. Jose was Visiting Chair of Australian Studies at Harvard University, 2009-10, and is an adjunct professor with the Writing and Society Research Centre at the University of Western Sydney. He was Chair of Creative Writing at The University of Adelaide from 2005-2008.

Presented by the Confucius Institute in partnership with the Westerly Centre and The Institute of Advanced Studies at The University of Western Australia.