The sixth annual Australia-China Centre for Transcultural Studies (ACTS) Symposium was held at UWA on 28 - 29 December 2018.

More than 20 academics from both Australia and China presented a diverse range of approaches to the topic ‘China’s Rise in Australia: a post engagement liberal order?’ Critical and cultural explorations of the issue were presented alongside detailed policy debates on geopolitical topics such as that of the South China Sea.

In alternating years this symposium is held in China by ACTS partner organisation, the China-Australia Centre for Transcultural Studies (CATS) at Beijing Foreign Studies University (BFSU).

ACTS and CATS aim to create a platform where the complexity of the Australia-China relationship can be explored through a transnational perspective. Cross-cultural collaboration is encouraged and a diversity of methodologies is considered a strength rather than a weakness.

As China Australia relations have engendered much debate in Australia over recent years it is considered essential that academic research plays a central role in these discussions to add nuance and methodological diversity.

This year’s ACTS Symposium successfully presented rich interdisciplinary discussion of recent and upcoming research in the Australia China space.

The conference opened with a keynote presentation from Professors Tao Xie, Mark Beeson and James Laurenceson.

Presenters

The complete list of delegates and presentation titles is listed below:

  • Youzhong SUN, Beijing Foreign Studies University (Chair)
  • Tao XIE, Beijing Foreign Studies University (Keynote), The China Challenge for Australia: From Engagement to Estrangement
  • Mark BEESON, University of Western Australia (Keynote), China's Rise and the rules-based liberal order: Implications for Australia
  • James LAURENCESON, University Technology Sydney (Keynote), Dissecting Australia’s “China Threat/Changst/China Panic
  • Hong CHEN, East China Normal University, China’s foreign policy in the new era and its implications for China-Australia relations
  • Purnendra JAIN, University of Adelaide, Australia’s Asia Engagement: Dealing with China, Japan and India
  • Kanishka JAYASURIYA, Murdoch University, The new post-engagement paradigm in Australia- China relations
  • Nicholas JOSE, University of Adelaide, Australian Humanities/Chinese Culture
  • Michael KEANE, Curtin University, Transcultural sharing, soft power and Chinese filter bubbles
  • Jianjun LI, Beijing Foreign Studies University/Western Sydney University, K. S. Prichard in China
  • Yang LIU, Beijing Foreign Studies University, Conceptualizing the Other in Intercultural Encounters: Review, Formulation and Typology of the Other-identity
  • Dora MARINOVA, Curtin University, What’s for dinner? The challenges of China–Australia animal-based food products
  • Greg McCARTHY, Peking University, University of Western Australia
  • Xiaoqin SHI, Zhejiang University, The Issue and the Way Out of the South China Sea Disputes
  • Kadambot SIDDIQUE, University of Western Australia, Sustainable Resource Use in Enhancing Agricultural Development in China
  • Rebecca STRATING, La Trobe University, Australia, the South China Sea and the Rules-Based Order
  • Yanrui WU, University of Western Australia, Structural Changes in China’s Economy: Progress and Challenges
  • Liping XIA, Tongji University, Asia-Pacific Economic Integration and China-Australia Relations
  • Lei YU, Liaocheng University, China-Australia Strategic Partnership in the Context of China’s Rise
  • Loretta BALDASSAR, University of Western Australia, Internationalisation at Home: the opportunities and challenges of engaging China-born students
  • Xianlin SONG, University of Western Australia, Internationalisation at Home: the opportunities and challenges of engaging China-born students
  • Yu TAO, University of Western Australia, Internationalisation at Home: the opportunities and challenges of engaging China-born students